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cumwhinton calculation policy 2018

Maths

We have introduced BIG Maths this year which we will use alongside Abacus to teach the Maths curriculum.

 

BIG Maths is a teaching approach that makes progress in maths easy and fun. BIG Maths has been extremely successful both nationally and internationally with thousands of children learning through daily BIG Maths ‘CLIC’ sessions and the weekly ‘Beat That!’ challenges.


Big Maths firstly answers the question, ‘How do we get children properly numerate as they journey through school?’ It provides us with an accurate and simple, but highly effective, framework that guarantees numeracy progress. This framework is known as CLIC (Counting, Learn Its, It’s Nothing New and Calculation) and is characterised by accurate steps of progression (known as Progress Drives) that make new learning easy and obvious to children by cashing in on the timeless natural laws of Maths.
 

BIG Maths is therefore a rigorous, systematic and structured approach that provides children with a fun and lively experience as they learn through jingles, songs, games and the BIG Maths characters.

 

Big Maths puts the child at the
heart of the learning experience.

 

Don't be surprised if your children come home talking about Clic, Pom, Pim, Squigglesworth or Count Fourways. They will be talking about Big Maths which is being introduced throughout Cumwhinton Primary School.

 

Big Maths helps children to understand the links between core numeracy (the basic principles that underly all maths) and outer numeracy which is the application of these core principles.

 

C L I C Sessions

 

 

CLIC stands for ‘Counting’, ‘Learn Its’, ‘It’s Nothing New’ and ‘Calculation’. Maths lessons contain each of these elements.

 

Counting:

Children will count forwards and backwards in all kinds of steps depending on their level e.g. in 1s, 2s, 3s, 6s or even 25s! When practising counting at home with your child, make sure you go forwards and backwards. Don’t always start at 0 – make sure they can count on from 75 to 106 for example.

 

‘Learn Its’:

‘Learn Its’ are addition facts and times tables facts. There are 72 Learns Its in total; 36addition Learn Its and 36 multiplication Learn Its. These are facts that children need to learn off by heart, so when they are asked ‘What is 6+4 ?’ they are able to give the answer as quickly as they would be able to tell you their name. As soon as they know 3x5=15 they also know 5x3=15 (This is known as a ‘Switcher’).


It’s Nothing New:

This is the most important aspect of CLIC. It is the way children become successful andproperly numerate. The idea that 5-things and 3-things are always 8-things is a fundamental concept. Once children understand this concept, we can change the ‘thing’ to other units, e.g. ‘tens’, so that 5 tens + 3 tens = 8 tens. Children begin to learn the concept by counting random unit e.g. bananas, aliens, cats etc. It then becomes much easier to use standardmeasures such as ml, m, cm, kg, whilst understanding the underlying number concepts.

 

 

Why should I play maths games with my child?

Children make progress best as mathematicians when they regularly repeat skills and practise them until they become embedded.  This can be quite a long process sometimes, and so the use of the context of an exciting game or interesting activity can be highly motivating.  

 

  • Multiple wipeoutBurst only the balloons that are multiples of the given table.

  • Splat SquareSplat the numbers in different colours. Play games, look for patterns and learn your numbers to 100.

  • Oxford Owl Maths - including an online maths dictionaryThe Oxford University Press have developed this site to support parents in helping their children with mathematics. You'll find lots of advice and support, games and activity ideas for how best to help your child develop as a mathematician. There's also information on what is taught in primary school maths lessons, and what some of the terminology means.

 

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